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    Sentence Correction
  I: Introduction
  II: Sentence Correction Tips
  III: Glossary
  IV: Three-Step Method
V: Seven Error Types  
1. Subject-Verb Agreement
a. Introduction
b. Subject/Verb Separation
c. Collective Nouns
d. Plural / Singular
e. Neither / Either
f. Or / Nor
g. Subject / Verb / Object
h. Quantity Words
i. Sample Questions
2. Modifiers
3. Parallelism
4. Pronoun Agreement
5. Verb Time Sequences
6. Comparisons
7. Idioms
  VI: Sample Questions

 

   

E. Subject-Verb Agreement: Neither / Either
 

 

Subject-Verb Agreement

A. Introduction
B. Subject / Verb Separation
C. Collective Nouns
D. Plural / Singular
E. Neither / Either
F. Or / Nor
G. Subject / Verb / Object
H. Quantity Words
I. Sample Questions

Neither and either always take singular verbs when acting as the subject of a sentence.

GMAT Sentence Correction: If graphic doesn't load, press shift-refresh in your webbrowser to reload the page.
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Here we have an example of a sentence in which the word "neither," not the plural noun "rosebushes," is the subject of the sentence. As per the stated rules above, "Neither" takes a singular verb when it acts as the subject of the sentence. Therefore, the singular verb "is" is correct. The sentence requires no alterations.

GMAT Sentence Correction: If graphic doesn't load, press shift-refresh in your webbrowser to reload the page.
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Here we have a similar construction: in this sentence, the word "either" acts as the subject, and therefore requires a singular noun. If you're at all confused, a helpful tip is to think of the word "either" as an abbreviation of the phrase "either one". Once you do so, it's easier to see that the phrase "of us" is just filler (that you can cross it out). The subject of the sentence is "either (one)", and so this sentence therefore requires a singular verb: "is".

 
 
 


D. Plural / Singular


F. Or / Nor